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Rose bounces back to basketball court

Editor-In-Chief

Published: Wednesday, February 6, 2013

Updated: Wednesday, February 6, 2013 13:02


 

Julian Rose wanted a second chance, and he got it. A junior on the court for the Braves, 5-9 in conference play right now, Rose goes to class and practices like any other student athlete.

When he goes home to his fiance and two children though, it serves as a reminder that he is doing this for more than just the love of the game.

“They keep me busy,” Rose said humorously of his 8-year-old daughter JaShae, and his 9-month old son Julian Jr.

The 27-year-old junior averages 10 points and 5 rebounds for the Braves - both third on the team in his first season at OU, but head coach Andy Carrier said Rose’s impact goes beyond the stat sheet.

“He’s been everything we thought he’d be and more,” Carrier said. “He’s coachable, he listens, and he cares about the team more than he does himself.”

Carrier calls Rose a hard worker with talent, a good passer that can score in a variety of ways, from shooting the three to finishing at the rim; all things an observer can see on the court.

Carrier also called Rose mature and a great role model; the things Rose admits lacking early in his playing career.

A high school dropout, in 2002, Rose decided to go to Barton County Community College with brothers Justin and Josh, to keep playing ball.

Justin, a future Central Florida Knight, had just graduated from Junction City High School and was on scholarship to Barton, while Josh had just gotten out of prison.

“I was out of school, getting in trouble and stuff,” he said. “I already had my GED, and the coach wanted me, so all three of us went there at the same time.”

After a redshirt season, Rose was a starter at the beginning of his second year, but poor grades cost him his eligibility in that second semester, and he was done.

He did not play again for eight years, during which he often worked two jobs, met his fiance Jessica Brungardt and had JaShae, now a third grader at Lincoln Elementary.

While he was out of school, Rose had some contact with Neosho and Seward County Community Colleges, and even attempted to go to Kansas State, but could not get his transcripts released for six years.

“I decided to go back to school because I didn’t want to continue working hard labor,” he said.

By 2011, Rose was returning to Barton about 50 pounds overweight, struggling to get financial aid money.

“They still weren’t putting me on financial aid because they had a hold on me, because of my past at Barton,” he said. “My past was haunting me.”

Rose said he was ready to call it quits. There was no scholarship or financial aid money to help fund his schooling, but Barton head coach Craig Fletcher told Rose to stick with it.

In that same semester, Rose had gotten back in playing shape, earned a 3.4 grade point average and was placed back on financial aid. On the court, he started to get attention as well.

“I started getting a couple of looks, but being how old I was, my clock had started already,” Rose said. “If I went (Division II) I could only play one year, but if I go NAIA, then I’d play two years.”

After a year at Barton, he visited KCAC schools McPherson and Bethany, but when he came to Ottawa, Rose said he felt comfortable with the team and coach.

“Talking to coach Carrier, he’s a straightforward dude, down-to-earth person,” he said. “I just kind of clicked. I felt like this would be a good place to come, get a degree and play basketball.”

Rose, a sports studies major, said his only focus was basketball back in 2002, but he sees college from a different angle now.

“Now that I’m a little older, I think more about my degree and having a career after I’m done with school,” he said. “I’m letting basketball be my focus for getting a degree.”Julian Rose wanted a second chance, and he got it. A junior on the court for the Braves, 5-9 in conference play right now, Rose goes to class and practices like any other student athlete.

When he goes home to his fiance and two children though, it serves as a reminder that he is doing this for more than just the love of the game.

“They keep me busy,” Rose said humorously of his 8-year-old daughter JaShae, and his 9-month old son Julian Jr.

The 27-year-old junior averages 10 points and 5 rebounds for the Braves - both third on the team in his first season at OU, but head coach Andy Carrier said Rose’s impact goes beyond the stat sheet.

“He’s been everything we thought he’d be and more,” Carrier said. “He’s coachable, he listens, and he cares about the team more than he does himself.”

Carrier calls Rose a hard worker with talent, a good passer that can score in a variety of ways, from shooting the three to finishing at the rim; all things an observer can see on the court.

Carrier also called Rose mature and a great role model; the things Rose admits lacking early in his playing career.

A high school dropout, in 2002, Rose decided to go to Barton County Community College with brothers Justin and Josh, to keep playing ball.

Justin, a future Central Florida Knight, had just graduated from Junction City High School and was on scholarship to Barton, while Josh had just gotten out of prison.

“I was out of school, getting in trouble and stuff,” he said. “I already had my GED, and the coach wanted me, so all three of us went there at the same time.”

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